Nestlé: Draining America Bottle By Bottle: Nestlé builds an empire at the expense of rural communities

Nestlé's headquarters by the waters of Lake Geneva in Vevey, Switzerland.  Photo provided by Nestlé
Nestlé's headquarters by the waters of Lake Geneva in Vevey, Switzerland. Photo provided by Nestlé

“At what point did water go from being a public resource and a basic human right to being a commodity?”— Deborah Lapidus, national organizer for Corporate Accountability International

Swiss-owned Nestlé is the Walmart of the bottled water industry. Like the mammoth retailer, Nestlé is a volume powerhouse: it already controls a third of the bottled water market in the United States and is expanding.

Continue reading Nestlé: Draining America Bottle By Bottle: Nestlé builds an empire at the expense of rural communities

The Pentagon’s War on America: Toxic Bureaucracy: Burned in Effigy

The buffer zone program around military installations to protect endangered species was never part of the Pentagon’s environmental law exemption efforts, which were essentially dead once Ray DuBois, the former Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment, left office. (Even one-time House Armed Services Military Readiness Subcommittee Chairman Joel Hefley, a Colorado Republican, voiced opposition to any further legal revisions before leaving Congress in 2006.) Continue reading The Pentagon’s War on America: Toxic Bureaucracy: Burned in Effigy

The Pentagon’s War on America: Toxic Bureaucracy: The Rollback

Ray DuBois, the former Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment, argued that environmental laws had been hampering realistic training long before President George W. Bush was elected. “It was not something that emerged full flower in my mind or after Jan. 20, 2001, in the Bush administration’s mind. This had been percolating for years. This doesn’t happen overnight. Encroachment doesn’t happen overnight.” Beginning with the fiscal year 2003 defense authorization bill, DuBois pressed Congress in each year of his tenure for exemptions and amendments for the military to just such environmental  laws. Continue reading The Pentagon’s War on America: Toxic Bureaucracy: The Rollback

The Pentagon’s War on America: Toxic Bureaucracy: Accusations of Bias

The result of the perchlorate battle was a win for the Pentagon, and Ray DuBois, the former Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment, found the process useful for downplaying the dangers of other potentially problematic chemicals. NAS’ stamp of approval was again sought after a draft EPA assessment was released on trichloroethylene (TCE), a degreasing solvent used for decades to clean military vehicles. The 2001 draft deemed TCE “highly likely to produce cancer in humans,” a ruling that would have had tremendous liability consequences for DOD.

Continue reading The Pentagon’s War on America: Toxic Bureaucracy: Accusations of Bias