AREVA in America: The French Connection

Spencer Abraham (left) watches President George Bush shake hands with Gov. Tom Ridge after signing two executive orders. Photo: Eric Draper
Spencer Abraham (left) watches President George Bush shake hands with Gov. Tom Ridge after signing two executive orders. Photo: Eric Draper

The French State-owned company has built close relationships with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) over the years. Former U.S. Senator and Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham is the Chairman of the Board of the U.S. branch of AREVA and uses his address book to promote the merits of this State-owned firm.

Spencer Abraham was the head of the Republican Party in Michigan before becoming U.S. Senator for Michigan from 1995 to 2001. When he lost his re-election bid, President George W. Bush named him Energy Secretary. He served from January 2001 to February 2005. One year after he left, Abraham became Chairman of the Board of AREVA Inc. – the U.S. branch of AREVA Group, the French nuclear power giant.

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Plan to build new base in Afghanistan

On June 30 2010, slightly more than a month after the Air Force announced that a CV-22 Osprey had crashed in Afghanistan killing three service members, one civilian employee and injuring many others, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced the solicitation for the bid for work designing and the building of “multiple facilities”. Of all the primary facilities, three CH-47/CV-22 capable fabric maintenance hangars are one of them. The estimated range of this project is US $25-100 million, and the expected period of performance is 300 days.

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EPA: Proposal to reduce power plant emissions in 31 states and D.C.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed a rule this week that would reduce the amount of air pollution emitted by power plants that crosses state lines.

Under the Clean Air Act, EPA is responsible for the management of interstate transport of air pollution. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from upwind power plants have made it challenging for some downwind states to meet federal clean air standards.

By 2014, the transport rule, in tandem with other state and federal regulations, would decrease SO2 emissions by 71 percent over 2005 levels, and NOx emissions would be reduced by 52 percent in 31 states and the District of Columbia.

“This rule is designed to cut pollution that spreads hundreds of miles and has enormous negative impacts on millions of Americans,” said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. “We’re working to limit pollution at its source, rather than waiting for it to move across the country. The reductions we’re proposing will save billions in health costs, help increase American educational and economic productivity, and – most importantly – save lives.”

When final, the transport rule will replace the 2005 Clean Air Interstate Rule, which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ordered EPA to revise in 2008. Regulations would become effective January 1, 2012.

READ THIS STORY AT EPA.GOV

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