NYT: When a Rig Moves In Next Door

The New York Times compares the cultural differences among supporters of natural gas drilling and the opponents. In Louisiana, residents overwhelmingly support the gas industry despite several incidents while Pennsylvania is divided over whether or not costs to the environment and drinking water are worth the monies paid to state and local governments and residents for gas drilling rights.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/business/energy-environment/07frack.html?pagewanted=3&ref=energy-environment

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VIDEO: Member of Obama’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future praises the discovery of hydraulic fracturing in relation to questions of extended, temporary, onsite nuclear storage

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Washington DC—Former Senator Pete Domenici took a moment during last week’s Blue Ribbon Commission hearing to praise the discovery of the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing. Mr. Domenici claimed that the discovery of hydraulic fracturing has affected the economic competitiveness of nuclear power in the United States.

Continue reading VIDEO: Member of Obama’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future praises the discovery of hydraulic fracturing in relation to questions of extended, temporary, onsite nuclear storage

First Signs of Puberty in Younger Girls

Scientists have been warning for years that chemicals in the environment that mimic estrogen are having effects on various species. A new report shows that girls are beginning to develop breasts are an earlier age.

Read the story in The New York Times…

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News Service: Group Says Coal Isn’t A Cash Cow for KY

Photo: Codrington, Stephen. Planet Geography 3rd Edition (2005)
Photo: Codrington, Stephen. Planet Geography 3rd Edition (2005)
Some argue in favor of the coal industry in Kentucky because it offers well-paying jobs in a number of areas where residents may not have them otherwise, but one group says there are costs associated with coal that few stop to think about.

Jason Bailey, research and policy director with the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development, says a study his group did on the issue examined areas where the state has to spend money because of the industry.

He said damage to roads and bridges associated with hauling millions of tons of coal each year are a really substantial cost to consider. He also points out that the huge regulatory system that is require to protect workers’ safety and health, public health, the environment, etc… is extremely costly.

He questions whether it makes sense to continue to focus state subsidies on an energy source that is both declining and also has some negative impacts.

READ THIS STORY AT NEWSSERVICE.ORG

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